INTRODUCTION TO WINSOCK RSHD/95

Copyright ã 1998 Denicomp Systems All Rights Reserved

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Winsock RSHD/95 (Remote Shell Daemon) is a service for Windows 95 and Windows 98 that accepts requests for command execution and file transfers from other hosts on the network via TCP/IP and executes them on the PC running Winsock RSHD/95. It runs under Microsoft Windows 95 and Windows 98 only.

Winsock RSHD/95 is similar to the Unix server of the same name, but provides some special functionality for the Windows environment, such as:

Ability to send keystrokes to the command running under Windows 95/98

Support for the rcp command to allow copying to and from the PC

Security mechanism to allow/deny access for hosts and users

Capture of standard output/standard error output of Console and MS-DOS programs

Command requests can come from hosts running other operating systems such as Unix or from other PC's running Windows 95/98, Windows NT, or Windows 3.1 using the standard rsh utility that comes with your TCP/IP package or Winsock RSH, also available from Denicomp Systems.

Files can be copied to the PC or from the PC running Winsock RSHD/95 using the standard TCP/IP rcp command. This includes the rcp command available with Unix or Windows NT or a PC-based rcp command such as Winsock RCP, also available from Denicomp Systems.

 

REQUIREMENTS

Winsock RSHD/95 requires a Intel x86-based PC running Windows 95 or Windows 98 and a network. The TCP/IP protocol must be installed and configured.

 

SECURITY

The purpose of a Remote Shell Daemon is to service the standard rsh and rcp commands. These commands were designed to be used on a network where users and systems were generally trusted and convenience was more desirable than security.

Since rsh and rcp do not require users to supply passwords before being granted access, there is the risk of unauthorized users being granted access to your system when running Winsock RSHD/95 (or any Remote Shell Daemon, for that matter). This risk is greatly increased if the system running Winsock RSHD/95 is connected to the Internet. Winsock RSHD/95 provides mechanisms for you to determine which hosts and users are granted access to your system. Firewalls can also help to reduce this risk. But the risk of unauthorized access still remains even when these are used because of the lack of password validation.

By installing Winsock RSHD/95, you are taking this risk of unauthorized access upon yourself. By installing Winsock RSHD/95, you are agreeing that you will not hold Denicomp Systems responsible for any damage caused by unauthorized access to your system through the standard rsh and rcp commands. Denicomp Systems did not design the rsh and rcp protocols; RSHD/95 simply implements the standard originally designed for Unix systems.

Please review the license agreement included with Winsock RSHD/95 and do not continue with the installation or with using it if you do not accept its terms.

  

WINSOCK RSHD/95 INSTALLATION

To install Winsock RSHD/95, insert the Winsock RSHD/95 diskette into your diskette drive. Click on the Windows 95 Start button, then choose Run from the menu. Then type the name of your diskette drive followed by "SETUP". For example, if the diskette is in the A: drive, type "A:SETUP". Then press the Enter key. (This can also be done from an MS-DOS prompt from within Windows 95 if you prefer).

The Winsock RSHD/95 Installation window will then appear. Verify that the drive letter shown in the Install From field is correct. If it is not, specify the proper drive.

Specify the directory in which you would like Winsock RSHD/95 to be installed in the Destination field. This will default to the \WRSHD95 directory on the drive where Windows 95 is installed. You may change it if you wish.

By default, Winsock RSHD/95 installs as a Windows 95 service. A service is a program that starts automatically when Windows 95 starts. It is transparent and does not require anyone to be logged in to Windows 95. If you do not want Winsock RSHD/95 to be installed as a service, uncheck the Install as a Windows 95 Service option . Winsock RSHD/95 can then be run as a program from the Start menu.

Press the Install button to begin the installation. Press Cancel if you wish to exit. Files will be copied from the diskette onto your hard drive.

If you chose to install RSHD/95 as a service, Winsock RSHD/95 will be installed in Windows 95's list of services and it will be started for you. You do not need to reboot.

If you did not choose to install RSHD/95 as a service, a menu selection for RSHD/95 will be created on your Start menu. To run RSHD/95, find and select RSHD/95 from the menu.

See the section on Controlling Winsock RSHD/95 for instructions on how to manually start and stop the Winsock RSHD/95 service.

 

REMOVING WINSOCK RSHD/95

To remove Winsock RSHD/95, use the Add/Remove Programs applet in the Windows 95 Control Panel. Choose Winsock RSHD/95 from the list of programs by clicking on it, then click on the Add/Remove button. Verify that the RSHD/95 installation directory is correct and click on the Uninstall button. Winsock RSHD/95 will be completely removed from your system. However, if you have placed other files in the RSHD/95 installation directory, the directory will not be removed.

RUNNING WINSOCK RSHD/95 AS A SERVICE

Under Windows 95, a service is a program that starts automatically when Windows 95 starts. It does not require you to log in to Windows 95 or select anything from the Start menu. It runs transparently. There is no RSHD/95 window. It does not appear in the Windows 95 Task List.

For those familiar with Windows NT services, Windows 95 services are much more rudimentary. There is no generic service controller as there is in Windows NT to allow you to start, stop, install, and uninstall services.

To give you some control over RSHD/95 when it is running as a service, a utility is included that provides some of the functions of NT's service controller. With it you can start, stop, and perform other functions that affect RSHD/95. This is explained later in the Controlling Winsock RSHD/95 section.

 

RUNNING WINSOCK RSHD/95 AS A PROGRAM

You can optionally run Winsock RSHD/95 as a Windows 95 program instead of a service. This requires that somone log in to Windows 95 and select RSHD/95 from the Start menu.

To start Winsock RSHD/95 as a program, execute the following command:

wrshd95

If you are executing this command from the Windows 95 MS-DOS, you should use the command:

start wrshd95

If you do not use the start command, you will not have access to that MS-DOS Prompt window until RSHD/95 is stopped. Be sure that you do not already have Winsock RSHD/95 running as a service.

After you start RSHD/95, you will not see any window display. It runs transparently; it will not even appear in the Windows 95 Task List. If you need to stop RSHD/95, see the section on Controlling Winsock RSHD/95 for more details.

 

WINSOCK RSHD/95 CONFIGURATION

Winsock RSHD/95 will work properly using its default configuration. You only need to configure Winsock RSHD/95 if you wish to change any of the available options, enable security, or use the logging capabilities. By default, no security is enforced and no logging is done

You configure Winsock RSHD/95 by using the Windows 95 Control Panel. In the Control Panel, you should see an icon labeled RSHD. Double-click on that icon to configure Winsock RSHD/95.

Important Note: After changing a Winsock RSHD/95 Configuration option, you do not need to stop and restart Winsock RSHD/95. It will recognize the change, unless you disable the monitoring of the registry (see below).

 

SECURITY AND LOGS

Security File: (Default: None)

Specify the full path name of the Security File used by Winsock RSHD/95 to enforce security (allow and deny users and hosts). The format of this file is explained in more detail later. If you do not specify a Security File, all users and hosts will be granted access to execute commands and transfer files to and from your PC, unless you enable the option that requires remote user names to exist as Windows 95 users (see below).

If you do specify a Security File and it does not exist, no users or hosts will be granted access. If you do not wish to enforce any security, do not specify a filename.

Must Remote Users be Valid Users on this System? (Default: Unchecked)

If this option is unchecked, user login names sent to Winsock RSHD/95 by rcp and rsh do not need to be valid users on this system. Security is enforced soley through the Security File.

If this option is checked, user login names from rcp and rsh must be valid users on the this system. If the user is not valid, access will be denied. This is the standard behavior of a rshd daemon. However, if the rcp and rsh commands are being executed from another operating system such as Unix, the user login names may not be the same between systems. If user logins are the same, you can then enable this option for security. If they are different, you should not enable this option.

Message Log: (Default: None)

Specify the full path name of a file where any messages from Winsock RSHD/95 should be stored. The message file is optional. You should only enable the message log when you are trying to find the source of a problem, since the message log can become quite large on an active system.

This option is used in conjunction with the Message Level option. If Message Level is set to a value greater than zero (0), Winsock RSHD/95 will output messages that provide information about its operation. These messages are mostly useful for problem determination.

The message file created is a text file that you can examine at any time using utilities such as TYPE or MORE, or editors such as Notepad. You can clear the message log at any time by simply deleting it.

Message Level: (Default: 0)

Specifies the level of detail of the messages stored in the file specified in the Message Log option. The default level is 0, which will not write any messages to the message log file. Levels 1 through 4 will product increasing amounts of detail (level 1 provides the least detail, level 4 provides the most).

Request Log: (Default: None)

This option allows you to log all requests (commands to be executed) in a file you specify. Each time someone attempts to execute a command through Winsock RSHD/95, the date and time, the user name, the host name, and the command will be written to this file.

Deny Log: (Default: None)

This option allows you to log all permission violations in a file you specify. Each time someone is denied permission to execute a command through Winsock RSHD/95, the date and time, the user name, the host name, and the command will be written to this file.

Error Log: (Default: None)

This option allows you to log all command execution errors in a file you specify. Each time someone receives an error trying to execute a command through Winsock RSHD/95, the date and time, the user name, the host name, the command, and error message will be written to this file. These are errors that occur after the user has been granted permission to execute the command. For example, an error would be logged if a program was to be run that did not exist.

 

NOTE: Each of the log files may refer to the same file name if you wish. They will not overwrite each other. Each message is appended to the end of the file. You should be sure to periodically delete the log file(s) because they can get large over time on an active system.

 

RSH OPTIONS

Reject All Incoming RSH Commands? (Default: Unchecked)

If you check this option, all incoming rsh commands will be rejected, effectively disabling the rsh serving capability of RSHD/95. This is useful if you only want to use RSHD/95 as an rcp server.

If a remote user attempts to issue an rsh command to this system, an error will be returned to the remote user stating that rsh has been disabled.

Attempt Redirection on Every Command: (Default: Checked)

When you execute a program through Winsock RSHD/95 and this option is not checked, it assumes that the program is a Windows program (not a Console or MS-DOS program) and there is no redirection of standard input, standard output, or standard error back to the remote system, unless you use the special <[CON]>, <[CON2]>, <[DOS]>, or <[DOS2]> indicators in the rsh command. (These are explained later.)

If you mostly execute Windows Console programs and/or MS-DOS programs via rsh through Winsock RSHD/95, you can check this option and Winsock RSHD/95 will assume that each program is a Console/MS-DOS program and attempt to send its standard output/standard error back to the remote system and receive standard input from the rsh command. It treats every rsh request as if the <[CON]> option was specified. You do not need to specify the <[CON]> indicator; it is assumed.

If you check this option, you still may execute Windows programs via rsh and they will operate properly. However, unless you specify the special <[WIN]> indicator for Windows programs in the rsh command, there are a few downsides: First, there will be slightly more overhead when executing Windows programs because Winsock RSHD/95 will attempt to do redirection when it is not necessary. Also, Winsock RSHD/95 will wait for the Windows program to complete before closing the connection, which means the rsh command will not end until the program completes. Again, these downsides can be overcome by specifying the <[WIN]> indicator when necessary, which disables redirection just for that rsh command.

Execute All Commands through Command Shell? (Default: Unchecked)

If you check this option, Winsock RSHD/95 will automatically prefix every command you execute with the default command shell (usually command.com /c).

This is useful if you commonly execute batch files (.BAT) or other command scripts for the shell you are using and you do not want to have to specify the shell command in every rsh command.

The default shell command is used as the prefix. This command can be specified in the Default Shell Command field; if no default shell command is specified there, command.com /c is used.

For example, if this option is enabled and you execute the following command from a remote system:

rsh win95 xyz.bat

RSHD/95 will execute the command as:

command.com /c xyz.bat

 

Disable Detection of Internal Commands (Default: Unchecked)

When you execute a command through Winsock RSHD/95, it examines the command to determine whether or not it is a command internal to the default command shell (interpreter). If it is, it automatically prefixes the command with the default command shell (specified in the Default Command Shell field).

Some commands are not actually programs; they are interpreted and executed internally by the command shell. In the Windows 95 command interpreter (COMMAND.COM), some examples of these are DIR, SET, and COPY. If you look on your hard drive, you will not find a DIR.EXE or COPY.EXE. They are part of the 95 command interpreter, COMMAND.COM.

So, if you tried to execute a DIR command through RSHD/95, it would not find the program since it doesn't exist. You would have to tell it to use the command interpreter by executing the command COMMAND.COM /C DIR.

By default, RSHD/95 examines the command and if it determines that the command is an internal command, it adds the shell command for you. You can disable this by checking this option. All commands will be executed as they are specified in the rsh command.

NOTE: If you check the option Execute All Commands through Command Shell?, this option is irrelevant, since the command shell will be added to the command in all cases.

Default Window Type for Commands: (Default: Normal)

This specifies the default window type to be used when executing commands through Winsock RSHD/95 using the rsh command. The default window type is used when the special window type indicators (<[NORMAL]>, <[MINIMIZE]>, <[MAXIMIZE]>, <[HIDE]>, etc.) are not specified in the rsh command.

The options available are:

Normal: The window for the command will display at its normal size.

Minimized: The window for the command will be minimized (without focus).

Maximized: The window for the command will be maximized.

Hidden: The window for the command will be hidden.

There are a few points you must consider when selecting the default window type:

List of Commands to Allow (File) (Default: None)

This option allows you to specify the name of a file that contains a list of commands that users are permitted to execute on this system through rsh. This allows you to provide strict control over the commands users can execute.

If no filename is specified here, all commands are permitted.

The file must be a plain text file, with each permitted command on a line by itself. Commands in the file should not contain any spaces. Comparison of commands is done only up to the first space or tab character.

When a user executes a command on this system through rsh, RSHD/95 will extract the first part of the command, up to the first space or tab character, and compare that to the lines in the file specified. If it does not exist in the file, the rsh command will be rejected.

Environment Variable File (Default: Blank)

This allows you to specify the name or names of files that contain environment variables that should be made available when commands are executed by RSHD/95 through rsh.

Normally, the environment for commands executed through RSHD/95 comes from the environment created using the AUTOEXEC.BAT file when your system starts. If the environment is changed in AUTOEXEC.BAT, you will need to reboot the system for them to be recognized by RSHD/95.

Alternatively, you can create a custom environment for RSHD/95 by entering the environment variables and values in a plain text file. Each line in the text file should have the format:

VARIABLE=VALUE

Each time a command is executed through RSHD/95 by rsh, a custom environment is built from the file or files specified in this parameter, based on the lines in those files.

You can specify a single filename or multiple filenames, with each separated by semi-colons (;). Each file is read in sequence and added to the System Environment Variables inherited by RSHD/95 to create a new environment for the command to be executed. If a variable name appears in multiple files, the last value read will be used.

You may reference previously set environment variables as you do in Windows 95 batch files using %VAR%. For example:

PATH=%PATH%;C:\MYPROGS

The filenames should be full path names. There are three special keywords that you can use in the filenames if you wish:

%ruser% - Substitute the login name of the remote user

%luser% - Substitute the login name of the local user

%rhost% - Substitute the host name of the remote host

The %ruser% substitutes the login name of the remote user. This will be the login name the user used to log into the remote host from which the rsh command is being issued, unless the -l option of the rsh command was used to specify a different user; then that user will be substituted.

The %luser% substitutes the login name of the local user on the remote host. Normally, it is the same as %ruser%, unless the -l option of the rsh command was used. Then, this will contain the actual user login used at the remote host.

For example, if you are logged in as "john" on a remote host and you issue the command "rsh -l mary win95 xyz", the %ruser% will substitute "mary" and the %luser% will substitute "john".

The %rhost% substitutes the host name of the remote host, if it is available. That is, RSHD/95 must be able to find the name of the remote host based on its IP address, either by using the HOSTS file or DNS. If it is not found, the IP address will be substituted.

These special keywords allow you to have different environment files for different users if necessary. For example, if you specify the environment variable file:

c:\env\%ruser%.env

When "john" issues an rsh command, RSHD/95 will get the environment from the file "c:\env\john.env". When "mary" issues an rsh command, RSHD/95 will get the environment from the file "c:\env\mary.env".

Also, using the capability to specify multiple files, you can have a single "master" environment, and then only modifications to it by user. For example, you can have a standard set of environment variables in the file "c:\env\master.env" and user-specific modifications in the file "c:\env\%ruser%.env". Your environment variable file field would read:

c:\env\master.env;c:\env\%ruser%.env

First the variables in master.env would be read, then those for the user in %ruser%.env.

 The Special "new" Keyword

The format of the environment variable files must be:

VARIABLE=VALUE

But, with one exception. If you specify the word "new" on a line by itself in an environment variable file, it will purge all environment variables set up to that point.

The primary purpose of this would be to remove all variables inherited from the System Environment Variables. It allows you to start with a "clean slate" and set all environment variables from scratch.

Default Command Shell (Default: None, use COMMAND.COM /C)

This option allows you to specify the default command shell to be used when RSHD/95 detects an internal command or the command shell to be used if the option to Execute All Commands through Command Shell is checked.

You should use this option only if you are using an alternate command shell. By default, RSHD/95 uses the Windows 95 command shell COMMAND.COM. You must specify all necessary options to the command shell so that it can be prefixed to any command (internal or external).

If you end the shell command with a single quote (') or double quote ("), RSHD/95 will supply the closing quote. This is necessary if the shell program would interpret options to the command executed as its own option. For example, if you are using an Windows version of the Bourne shell, you should specify the following as the command shell:

sh -c "

If you do not specify the trailing quote, the sh command will interpret options to the commands you execute instead of passing them to the command.

Internal Command List (Default: None, use COMMAND.COM list)

If you specified a Default Command Shell that has different internal commands than those of the standard Windows 95 command shell COMMAND.COM, you can specify the internal commands for that shell here. Separate each command with a comma (,). Do not include any spaces. By default, RSHD/95 recognizes the internal commands of the Windows 95 command shell.

Internal commands are commands that are interpreted and executed by the command shell. They do not exist as executable files (.EXE or .COM). If RSHD/95 does not recognize a command as an internal command, you must prefix it with the command shell.

You only need to specify this list if you want RSHD/95 to recognize commands internal to your command shell and automatically prefix the command with the appropriate shell command.

If you checked the option to Disable Detection of Internal Commands, this is not necessary and will have no effect.

For example, you could specify:

cd,dir,type

Whenever you execute the command:

rsh win95 dir

It would see that "dir" is in the internal command list and prefix it with the Default Command Shell before executing it.

Buffer Stdout/Stderr Until End of Command? (Default: Unchecked)

Check this option if you want RSHD/95 to buffer (store in a file) the standard output and standard error output of the commands you execute, and then send all of the output when the command completes.

Prior to Version 2.0, this was the standard behavior of RSHD/95. With Version 2.0, the standard output and standard error is sent as it occurs (although it may be buffered by Windows 95 or the program executed). If you check this option, RSHD/95 will operate as it did in previous versions.

 

RCP OPTIONS

Reject All RCP Copies to This System (Default: Unchecked)

If this option is checked, all attempts to copy files to this system with the rcp command will be rejected with an error message stating that incoming copies are disabled. This allows you to make the system "read only" when using the rcp command. You can also reject copying from the system, essentially disabling the rcp capability of RSHD/95.

Reject All RCP Copies to From System (Default: Unchecked)

If this option is checked, all attempts to copy files from this system with the rcp command will be rejected with an error message stating that outgoing copies are disabled. This allows you to make the system "write only" when using the rcp command. You can also reject copying to the system, essentially disabling the rcp capability of RSHD/95.

Preserve Case in Multi-File Copies: (Default: Unchecked)

Specifies whether Winsock RSHD/95 should preserve the case of filenames when files are copied from this system by rcp using wildcards or recursive copies. By default, when the remote system uses a wildcard or recursive copy to get files from this PC, Winsock RSHD/95 will convert all directory and filenames to lowercase letters before sending them to the remote system.

Although the Windows 95 filesystem is not case sensitive (ABC and abc are the same file), it can store the case of the filename. When copying files via rcp to operating systems that are case sensitive, such as Unix, it is usually most useful to convert all of the names to lowercase letters.

If you do not wish to have all of the names converted to lowercase letters, check this option. The rcp command will then create files in exactly the same case as the names appear in the directory under Windows 95.

Note that this affects only wildcard and recursive copies. When copying individual files, the files will be created in the case you specify in the rcp command.

Automatic End-of-Line Conversion (Default: Never)

This specifies whether or not RSHD/95 should perform any end-of-line conversions on files transferred to or from the Windows 95 system using rcp.

Under MS-DOS, Windows 3.x, Windows 95, and Windows NT, lines of text are delimited by carriage return and newline pairs (ASCII 13 and ASCII 10). Under Unix, lines of text are delimited by only newlines (ASCII 10). Often, when copying text files between the two operating systems, it is necessary to convert the end-of-line delimiters to the proper method. RSHD/95 provides a way to automatically do this.

When files are copied from the Windows 95 system through RSHD/95, carriage returns will be removed from all carriage return/newline pairs (i.e. converted to Unix format). When files are copied to the 95 system through RSHD/95, carriage returns will be added to every newline character that is not already prefixed by a carriage return (i.e. converted to 95 format).

There are four options available. The option you select affects all rcp copies to this system and all rcp copies from the system. It does not affect the operation of the rcp command on the 95 system. It only affects the result of rcp commands that access files on this system from other systems.

No end-of-line conversion will be done. All files will be transferred or received unmodified.

Convert the end-of-line characters on every file copied from or to this system through RSHD/95.

Only convert end-of-line characters in files ending with the specified list of file extensions. You must then enter the list of file extensions. Separate each file extension by a comma. Do not include any spaces. You must include the "dot" (.). For example: .TXT,.C,.H,.PRN,.MAK

Any file not ending in one of these extensions will be copied without modification.

RSHD/95 will examine the contents of the first block of the file to be sent or received and determine whether or not an end-of-line conversion is necessary. If the first block contains only text characters (letters, numbers, spaces, tabs, carriage returns, newlines, backspaces, escapes, and form feeds), RSHD/95 will perform an end-of-line conversion on the file. If the first block contains any other non-text data, it will be copied without modification.

The size of the first block is specified in the RCP Block Size field.

RCP Home Directory (Default: Blank)

Specifies the starting directory where files will be copied from or to when a relative path name is used in an rcp command (no initial slash or backslash).

This directory must exist if specified. The directory name specified can contain the following special keywords:

%ruser% - Substitute the login name of the remote user

%luser% - Substitute the login name of the local user

%rhost% - Substitute the host name of the remote host

The %ruser% substitutes the login name of the remote user. This will be the login name the user used to log into the remote host from which the rcp command is being issued, unless the @ option of the rcp command was used to specify a different user; then that user will be substituted (e.g. user@host:filename).

The %luser% substitutes the login name of the local user on the remote host. Normally, it is the same as %ruser%, unless the @ option of the rcp command was used. Then, this will contain the actual user login used at the remote host.

For example, if you are logged in as "john" on a remote host and you issue the command "rcp xyz mary@win95:", the %ruser% will substitute "mary" and the %luser% will substitute "john".

The %rhost% substitutes the host name of the remote host, if it is available. That is, RSHD/95 must be able to find the name of the remote host based on its IP address, either by using the HOSTS file or DNS. If it is not found, the IP address will be substituted.

RCP Block Size: (Default: 512)

Specifies the number of bytes in a block of data that the Remote Copy (rcp) service of Winsock RSHD/95 processes at one time. When files are copied to the PC, it reads from the network and writes to the disk in blocks of this size. When files are copied from the PC, it reads from the disk and writes to the network in blocks of this size. Note that this is an internal block size only; it does not change any TCP/IP parameters.

RCP Spoofing Prefix: (Default: None)

This specifies the first characters of the rcp command send by the remote host that Winsock RSHD/95 should use when "spoofing" the rcp protocol. With its roots in Unix, the rcp command actually internally executes an rsh command to start rcp on the remote host before transferring files. Winsock RSHD/95 "spoofs" or looks for rcp commands executed through rsh by the remote host and services the rcp transfer.

By default, Winsock RSHD/95 looks for the command prefixes of:

 rcp -

/usr/bin/rcp -

/usr/lib/sunw,rcp -

set vms_rcp = 1 ; rcp -

Some rcp commands (especially those on non-Unix and non-Windows systems) may send other commands to initiate the rcp protocol. If yours does, you should enter the command prefix (up to and including the first hyphen) here. The last character should always be a hyphen with nothing after it, including spaces.

Regardless of the spoofing prefix entered, Winsock RSHD/95 will continue to look for the above default prefixes.

 

ADVANCED OPTIONS

Installation Directory: (Default: C:\WRSHD95)

This is the directory where Winsock RSHD/95 is installed. This will be filled in by the RSHD/95 installation program. If you move RSHD/95 to another location, you must update this.

Initial Working Directory: (Default: None, use Installation)

This specifies the directory that will initially be considered the current working directory for all commands executed using rsh. It will also be considered the current working directory for all files copied using rcp, unless an RCP Home Directory is specified. If this is blank, then the Installation Directory becomes the initial working directory.

When RSHD/95 starts, it changes to this directory and remains there, unless an rsh request is received to execute the cd or chdir command, which will change RSHD/95's working directory.

Note that a cd or chdir command will change RSHD/95's working directory for all subsequent commands, regardless of the user or system they are executed from.

Disable Multithreading in RSHD/95: (Default: Unchecked)

Multithreading allows Winsock RSHD/95 to process multiple requests simultaneously. When multithreading is disabled by checking this option, Winsock RSHD/95 will accept and complete only one request at a time. Other requests received during this time will be queued and executed in the order in which they were received. Normally, you will want multithreading enabled, but you can disable it, for example, to ensure that the system will not become bogged down with requests.

Disable Monitoring of Registry for Changes: (Default: Unchecked)

Normally, if you change a configuration option using the RSHD icon in the Control Panel and click on the OK button, it sends a signal to RSHD/95 to tell it to re-examine the setup options stored in the Registry and apply any changes.

If this option is checked to disable the monitoring of the Registry, this signal will be ignored. You must stop and start Winsock RSHD/95 manually (or reboot the system) for the Registry changes to take effect.

You may want the Registry monitoring disabled for security purposes so that no Winsock RSHD/95 options are changed while the system is in operation.

Note: RSHD/95 does not actually "monitor" the Registry for changes; it waits for a signal to come from the RSHD Control Panel applet and then re-reads the registry options. Unlike Windows 95, Windows 95 does not have the ability to determine when Registry options have changed. So if you use a program like REGEDIT to change RSHD/95 setup options, they will not take effect unless you stop and start RSHD/95.

Host IP Address (If Multi-Homed): (Default: None)

If your system is multi-homed (it has multiple network cards, each with its own IP address), you can specify which IP address RSHD/95 will use to listen for requests. If you leave this empty, it will accept requests from any of the IP addresses associated with the system. If you specify one of the addresses of one of the cards (in dotted-decimal format), it will only accept requests routed to that address.

Listen Port: (Default: 514)

Specifies the port number that Winsock RSHD/95 listens to for connections. The standard port for the Remote Shell daemon is 514.

Listen Backlog: (Default: 100)

Specifies the number of requests that can be backlogged when Winsock RSHD/95 is listening for connections. The minimum is 1; the maximum for Windows 95 is 100.

 

WINSOCK RSHD/95 SECURITY FILE

With Unix, security is enforced on remote command execution using a combination of the password file (/etc/passwd), the hosts file (/etc/hosts),and the host equivalency files (/etc/hosts.equiv and $HOME/.rhosts).

Winsock RSHD/95 enforces security through the Security File. The name of this file is specified in the Winsock RSHD/95 Configuration in the Security File entry.

If you specify a Security File name and the file does not exist or the file is completely empty, all hosts and users are denied access.

Conversely, if you do not specify a Security File, all hosts and users are granted access. So if you do not wish to enforce any security, do not specify a Security File name in the configuration file.

Additionally, you can configure Winsock RSHD/95 to ensure that user names on remote hosts are valid on this system. You should only enable this security option if you use consistent user names across all of the systems on your network.

You create the Security File using a text editor. If you are using the Winsock RSHD/95 Control Panel applet, you can click on the Edit Security button to run the Windows Notepad editor to edit the security file specified in the Security File configuration option.

The Security File consists of lines that specify who may or may not access the PC using Winsock RSHD/95. The following are the options available in:

 

#

Any line beginning with # is treated as a comment and is ignored.

+

A plus sign (+) on a line by itself specifies that ALL hosts and users are granted permission. This is useful if you wish to allow many hosts and users, but deny only a few. Use the deny options on subsequent lines.

Host

You can specify a host that is granted permission by entering the name of the host on a line by itself. All users on that host are granted permission, unless you specifically deny those users on subsequent lines.

!host

You can specify a host that is denied permission by entering an exclamation point (!) followed by the name of the host name of the host on a line. All users on that host are denied permission, regardless of subsequent lines.

+user

You can specify a user name that is granted permission by entering a plus sign (+) followed by the user name on a line. Do not put any spaces between the plus sign and the user name. That user will be granted permission regardless of the host (as long as the host is not specifically denied). See below for an explanation of the source of the user name and how it is validated.

-user

You can specify a user name that is to be denied permission by entering a minus sign (-) followed by the user name on a line. Do not put any spaces between the plus sign and the user name. That user will be denied permission on all hosts. See below for an explanation of the source of the user name and how it is validated.

+user@host

You can specify a user name and a host that is granted permission by entering a plus sign (+) followed by the user name, an at-sign (@), followed by the host name on a line. Do not put any spaces between the plus sign and the user name or before or after the at-sign. That user on the specified host will be granted permission, but only from that host.

-user@host

You can specify a user name and a host that is denied permission by entering a minus sign (-) followed by the user name, an at-sign (@), followed by the host name on a line. Do not put any spaces between the minus sign and the user name or before or after the at sign. That user on the specified host will be denied permission, but only when coming from that host.

When specifying the host on the lines in the Security File, you may use either a host name or an IP address (in dotted-decimal format). If you use a host name, that name must be resolvable by TCP/IP, either through the hosts file or through DNS.

You may use wildcard characters when specifying the user and/or host name in the Security File. The wildcard characters that can be used are:

*

Matches multiple characters. Example: *.sprynet.com

?

Matches a single character. Example: 192.72.124.??

[ ]

Matches a list of characters or range of characters. Example: 204.22.6[5-9].*

[! ]

Matches characters NOT in a list or range of characters. Example: 204.22.[!5-9]?.*

If the request is coming from a Unix system, the user name is the login name of the user. If the request is coming from another Windows PC, the method of specifying the user name is determined by the implementation of the rsh or rcp command you are using.

Note that the standard Unix rsh command (and the Winsock RSH command available from Denicomp Systems) allows a "-l" option to specify an alternate user name. The "-l" option has meaning on a Unix system, but is not especially useful with Winsock RSHD/95. However, if you do use the "-l" option to specify an alternate user, as with Unix, that user must be granted permission through the Security File in addition to the login name (Unix) or the name specified in your particular TCP/IP implementation (Windows/DOS).

 

USING THE SECURITY FILE

To effectively use the Security File, you must first understand how it is viewed by Winsock RSHD/95.

When Winsock RSHD/95 receives a request, it sequentially processes the lines in the Security File to determine whether or not the host and user are granted or denied access. It looks at each line in the Security File until it determines that either the host or the user is specifically denied permission.

Winsock RSHD/95 begins by assuming that permission is denied for the request. It then examines the lines in the Security File to see if any of the lines pertain to this request.

Once Winsock RSHD/95 finds a line that denies access to either the user or the host, it stops looking and denies permission.

If it finds a line that grants permission to the user and/or host, permission is tentatively granted, but it continues to process the lines in the Security File.

If it processes the entire Security File and does not find a line that grants permission to the user and/or the host, permission is denied. If security was tentatively granted at some point and not denied subsequently, permission is granted.

For example, let's say that the following is the contents of the Security File:

jetty

booey

eib

192.56.42.3

+fred@mars

-gary@booey

-jackie

+robin

*.netcom.com

In this example, if any user on the host "jetty" makes a request, permission will be granted, unless the user is "jackie", since "jackie" is denied access from all hosts (-jackie).

If "jackie@jetty" makes a request, Winsock RSHD/95 reads through the Security File and finds the host name "jetty", and tentatively grants permission. However, it continues and finds that the user "jackie" is denied from all hosts, so permission is denied.

Also, if any user on the host "booey" makes a request, they are granted permission unless the user is "gary", since "gary@booey" is specifically denied permission (-gary@booey). All other users on the host "booey" are granted permission except "jackie" (-jackie).

The user "fred" on the host "mars" is granted permission because of the line "+fred@mars". However, since the host "mars" does not appear on a line by itself, no other users on the host "mars" are granted permission except the user "robin", who is granted permission from any host (+robin).

Finally, all users making requests from systems whose host names end in ".netcom.com" are granted permission, unless the user is "jackie", since "jackie" is denied permission from all systems.

 

TROUBLESHOOTING THE SECURITY FILE

If you think you have properly set up the Security File, but you are being denied access when you think you should be granted access, the following provides some tips on determining the cause of the problem:

If these tips do not help, enter a filename in the Message File field and a 4 in the Message Level field in the RSHD/95 Control Panel applet. Then execute rsh or rcp from a system that should be given access, then examine the Message File. It will contain a trace of the steps RSHD/95 is using to validate the remote user and host.

 

EXECUTING COMMANDS

With Unix, the rsh utility executes the specified command on a remote host and returns the standard output and the standard error output to the requesting host.

With Windows, there is no such thing as "standard output" and "standard error". Programs execute in graphical windows, so there is no way to return any output using rsh.

Therefore, when using rsh from Unix or another PC to initiate commands on a Windows PC, you will not see any output of the command on your screen. It will display on the PC that received the request.

For example, if you used the following command:

rsh win95 excel

This would start Excel on the PC named "win95". You would see nothing on your screen as a result of starting Excel. Excel would be running on the screen of the PC named "win95".

The rsh command will NOT wait for the specified command to complete. The system issuing the request will regain control immediately after the command begins.

If you attempt to execute a command that does not exist or Windows returns an error trying to load the program, you will receive a descriptive error message on your screen from Winsock RSHD/95 to tell you that the command was not successfully executed.

 

STANDARD INPUT/OUTPUT/ERROR REDIRECTION

You can optionally capture the standard output and standard error output of Windows Console or MS-DOS programs through Winsock RSHD/95 with the rsh command. This allows you to display the output of these programs that output to the standard output or standard error on another screen or capture it to a file on another system. It also allows you to send the standard input from rsh to the remote program. This is known as redirection.

By default, Winsock RSHD/95 automatically attempts redirection on every program executed using rsh, to capture the standard output and standard error and send it back to the rsh command, and receive standard input sent to it by the rsh command and provide it to the program executed.

If you mostly execute Console or MS-DOS programs through RSHD/95, this default behavior of automatic redirection is the most useful. However, it does have some downsides when you want to execute graphical programs through RSHD/95 (which do not have standard input/output/error) or you simply do not need redirection even for console or DOS programs.

The downsides to automatic redirection are:

You can control this in two ways, if necessary:

Option 1. If you only occasionally need to use rsh to execute graphical programs or console/DOS programs where you do not want rsh to wait until they complete, you can add the special "<[WIN]>" option in the rsh command. This tells RSHD/95 that it should not attempt redirection on this program only. For example:

rsh win95 "<[WIN]>" excel abc.xls

or

rsh win95 "<[WIN]%FP~%FX>" excel abc.xls

These will run the command "excel abc.xls" on win95 as a Windows program and send the specified keystrokes to it, disabling standard I/O redirection.

Option 2. If you mostly execute graphical programs or you usually do not want to do redirection on console/DOS programs because you do not care about the output, you should uncheck the option labeled Attempt Redirection on Every Command in the RSHD/95 Control Panel applet. If you uncheck this option, RSHD/95 will not automatically attempt redirection, unless you specify the special "<[CON]>" option in the rsh command. This tells RSHD/95 that it should attempt redirection on this program only. For example:

rsh win95 "<[CON]>" net view

This will run the "net view" command on "win95" and display the output on your screen. The "net view" command displays information on the standard output.

WAITING FOR COMMANDS TO COMPLETE

If you have unchecked the RSHD/95 Control Panel option labeled Attempt Redirection on Every Command, programs executed through rsh will return control back to rsh immediately after the program begins. It will not wait until it completes.

If you want the rsh command to wait until the program finishes executing, you can use the special "<[WAIT]>" option in the rsh command. For example, to execute the command "bkgprint" and wait for it to finish, use:

rsh win95 "<[WAIT]>" bkgprint

 

SENDING KEYSTROKES

Winsock RSHD/95 provides the ability for you to send keystrokes to the Windows application you initiate using the rsh command. It also allows you to specify how the window is to be displayed (i.e., normal, minimized, maximized, or hidden). This provides you with some "remote control" over what the program you run does once it starts.

For those of you who program in Microsoft Visual Basic or the Visual Basic for Applications macro language, this is very similar to the SendKeys capability of those programming languages.

The standard syntax of the rsh command is:

rsh hostname command

This will execute "command" on the host "hostname". Winsock RSHD/95 allows a slight modification of the rsh syntax to send keystrokes. This is compatible with all rsh commands. The alternative syntax for sending keystrokes is:

rsh hostname "<keystrokes>" command

If the first parameter after the host name begins with a less-than sign (<), that parameter is interpreted as keystrokes to be sent to the command specified in the next parameter. The keystrokes must end with a greater-than sign (>). You must also enclose the entire parameter in quotes so special characters and spaces are not interpreted by the operating system.

For example, if you wanted to run the Windows Notepad on the PC named "win95" and type "This is a test" on the first line, the command would be:

rsh win95 "<This is a test>" notepad

If you looked at the win95's screen, you would see the Windows Notepad with "This is a test" on the first line.

You cannot send keystrokes to an application that is not designed to run in Microsoft Windows (i.e., MS-DOS programs).

Important Note: Due to a limitation in Windows 95, you cannot send keystrokes to an application started through Winsock RSHD/95 if there is no one logged in to Windows 95. The program will be executed, but it will not receive the keystrokes.

 

SENDING SPECIAL KEYSTROKES

Winsock RSHD/95 also allows you to specify special keys in the keystrokes parameter that cannot normally be typed on a command line, such as embedded Enter keys, function keys, ALT keys, etc.

Keystrokes are sent sequentially as they appear between the "<" and ">". To send a single character, use the character itself. For example, to send the letter "X", use the letter "X". To send the word "hello", just specify those letters.

To specify keys combined with any combination of Shift, Ctrl, and Alt keys, prefix the regular key code to one or more of the following codes:

Shift

+

Control

^

Alt

%

 

For example, to send the Alt-F keystroke, specify "%F". To send Ctrl-Alt-D, specify "^%D".

To send the Enter key, use the tilde (~).

To specify that the Shift, Ctrl, and/or Alt keys should be held down while several other keys are pressed, enclose the key codes in parentheses ( ). For example, to have the Alt key held down while X and D are pressed, use "%(XD)". You could also use "%X%D", but if the Shift, Ctrl, and/or Alt keys need to be held down for a number of keystrokes, the parentheses can make the string shorter. Also, you would want to use the parentheses if the application detects the release of the Shift, Ctrl, and/or Alt keys and that is not desired.

The following characters have special meaning in the keystroke parameter, so they must be enclosed inside braces ({ }). Some of these special characters have not been explained yet.

Special Character

Example

Special Character

Example

+ (plus)

{+}

^ (caret)

{^}

% (percent)

{%}

~ (tilde)

{~}

< (less than)

{<}

> (greater than)

{>}

[ (left sq. bracket)

{[}

] (right sq. bracket)

{]}

( (left paren)

{(}

) (right paren)

{)}

{ (left brace)

{{}

} (right brace)

{}}

@ (at-sign)

{@}

 

 

 

To send characters that are not normally displayed when you press a key (such as Enter or Tab) and keys that represent actions rather than characters, use the following special codes:

 

Key

Code

Key

Code

Backspace

{BACKSPACE} or {BS}

Break

{BREAK}

Caps Lock

{CAPSLOCK}

Clear

{CLEAR}

Del

{DELETE} or {DEL}

Down Arrow

{DOWN}

End

{END}

Enter

{ENTER} or ~

Esc

{ESCAPE} or {ESC}

Help

{HELP}

Home

{HOME}

Ins

{INSERT}

Left Arrow

{LEFT}

Num Lock

{NUMLOCK}

Page Down

{PGDN}

Page Up

{PGUP}

Print Screen

{PRTSC}

Right Arrow

{RIGHT}

Scroll Lock

{SCROLLLOCK}

Tab

{TAB}

Up Arrow

{UP}

F1 through F16

{F1} through {F16}

 

To send the function keys F1 through F16, use {F1} through {F16}.

You can also specify that a key is to repeat itself a certain number of times, without repeating the key itself in the string. To repeat a keystroke, use the format:

{keystroke number}

Where "keystroke" is the key to repeat, followed by a single space, then the number of times to repeat the key. For example, to press the down arrow key eight times, use "{DOWN 8}". To type thirty *'s, use "{* 30}".

 

PAUSING WITHIN KEYSTROKES

Under some circumstances, it may be necessary to pause for a specific time before sending keystrokes to allow a program operation to complete. This is usually necessary when a program ignores keystrokes that have been queued while a long operation takes place.

Within the keystroke list, you can specify pauses by using the special {PAUSE #} keystroke.

This is not actually a keystroke, in that it does not press any key, but it can be included anywhere within the keystroke list. It will pause the specified number of seconds.

For example, the following keystroke list will press Alt-F, P, wait 10 seconds, then press Alt-F, X:

<%FP{PAUSE 10}%FX>

You can specify multiple pauses in the keystroke list if necessary.

 

KEYSTROKE EXAMPLE

The following example, will start Microsoft Word, load a file, print it, then exit.

rsh win95 "<%FO\docs\invoice.doc~%FP~%FX>" word

The keystrokes are:

Keystroke String

Sent

Description

%F

Alt-F

Drops down the file menu

O

O

Selects Open

\docs\invoice.doc

\docs\invoice.doc

Types the filename.

~

Enter

Loads the File

%F

Alt-F

Drops down the file menu

P

P

Selects Print

~

Enter

Accepts the defaults on the Print dialog box

%F

Alt-F

Drops down the file menu

X

X

Selects eXit and Word exits

 

Note that if this example were being run from a Unix system, you would have to use two backslashes (\\) for every one desired backslash because the Unix shells interpret the backslashes as special characters. The command would then be:

rsh win95 "<%FO\\docs\\invoice.doc~%FP~%FX>" word

KEYSTROKE MACRO FILES

If your keystroke strings get rather long or complex, you can store them in a keystroke macro file so you do not have to specify all of them each time you use the rsh command.

To create a keystroke macro file, you must use a text editor (or a word processor, but be sure to save as an ASCII file). Enter the keystrokes as you would on the rsh command line, with the following exceptions/reminders:

Do not enter "<" as the first character in the file or ">" as the last character. All of the characters you enter in the file will be sent.

You may press Enter in the file to enter the keystrokes on multiple lines. The line breaks have no effect on the keystrokes. They will be treated as if they were entered all on the same line. That is, you must remember to still use "~" or "{ENTER}" to "press" the Enter key. Pressing Enter in the file will not send the Enter key.

You cannot nest keystroke macros. Your macro file cannot contain references to other keystroke macro files.

The keystroke macro file must reside on the PC running Winsock RSHD/95. You can create the file on that PC or use rcp to copy it to that PC before executing the command.

To use a keystroke macro file, enter the at-sign (@) followed by the filename in braces ({ }) where you would normally specify keystrokes on the rsh command line.

You will most likely need to specify a full pathname of the keystroke file on the PC running Winsock RSHD/95, unless you know the working directory of Winsock RSHD/95 on the system running it and the keystroke macro resides in that directory. You may use forward slashes (/) instead of backslashes if you wish; this makes life easier for Unix users because the shell interprets the backslash characters.

For example, if you had a macro in the directory \kbmac\printss.mac on the PC running Winsock RSHD/95, you could use it with this command:

rsh win95 "<@{/kbmac/printss.mac}>" excel

This would run "excel" on win95 and send the keystrokes stored in the file \kbmac\printss.mac to it.

You can intermix command line keystrokes and macro file keystrokes. That is, you can specify some of the keystrokes on the command line and use some from a macro file. You can also use multiple macro files.

For example, let's say we want to print a file using rsh through a Windows application called "wintiff". We want to store the keystrokes in a macro file, but do not want to store the filename in the macro file because it can change.

To do this you can store the first set of keystrokes in one macro file, specify the filename on the rsh command line, then store the remaining keystrokes in a second file.

For example, let's say the file is "mypic.tif":

rcp mypic.tif win95:/tmp

rsh win95 "<@{/kb/tif1.mac}\tmp\mypic.tif~@{/kb/tif2.mac}" wintiff

This example copies the file "mypic.tif" to the \tmp directory on win95. Then it runs "wintiff" and first sends the keystrokes from the file \kb\tif1.mac. That macro ends when "wintiff" requires a filename. The keystrokes to "type" the filename come from the rsh command line since the tif1.mac has ended. Then it continues by sending the keystrokes in the file \kb\tif2.mac. That is:

 

@{/kb/tif1.mac}

Send keystrokes from \kb\tif1.mac

\tmp\mypic.tif~

Type \tmp\mypic.tif and press Enter

@{/kb/tif2.mac}

Send keystrokes from \kb\tif2.mac

 

SPECIFYING THE WINDOW TYPE

Winsock RSHD/95 also allows you to specify the window type of the application being run. Normally, the application is run using the default window type specified in the RSHD/95 Control Panel applet (the Default Window Type of Commands option)."normally", as if you ran it by double-clicking on its icon (assuming you did not set up the icon to run it minimized).

If you want to specify a different method of displaying the application's window, you can specify this inside the keystroke parameter by enclosing the method in square brackets ([ ]).

There are two methods of setting the window type. You can use one of the words shown below or you can use a number. The options are:

Window Option

Displays

NORMAL or NORM

Normal Display as defined by the application

MINIMIZE or MIN

Shows the application as a minimized icon without focus

MINACTIVE or MINA

Shows the application as a minimized icon with focus

MAXIMIZE or MAX

Maximizes the application on startup

HIDE

Hides the application (no icon appears)

0

Same as HIDE

1

Same as NORMAL

7

Same as MINIMIZE

2

Same as MINACTIVE

3

Same as MAXIMIZE

 

Other numeric values may be used - they correspond to the Windows' ShowWindow function (for all you programmers).

For example, if you want to run the Windows Notepad maximized, viewing the file "heyyou.txt", you would type:

rsh win95 "<[MAXIMIZE]>%FOheyyou.txt~" notepad

This runs the Notepad maximized, then "presses" Alt-F-O (File Open) and types the filename "heyyou.txt" and presses Enter to load it.

If you wanted to run some application that does some task and exits, you could run it minimized using:

rsh win95 "<[MINIMIZE]>" bkgprint

Note that Windows does not allow you to send keystrokes to a minimized or hidden application. Therefore, "[MINIMIZE]", "[HIDE]", "[0]", or "[2]" should always appear alone between the "<" and ">". If you specify other keystrokes, the application will not receive them (Windows will beep at you for each keystroke).

 

SHUTTING DOWN AND REBOOTING WINDOWS THROUGH RSHD/95

RSHD/95 internally understands four special commands that allow you to remotely shutdown, powerdown, or reboot the Windows 95 system or to logoff any user on the system through the rsh command. These commands require the special <[INTERNAL]> or <[INT]> indicators. The commands have the following syntax:

rsh win95 "<[INT]>" shutdown [#]

rsh win95 "<[INT]>" poweroff [#]

rsh win95 "<[INT]>" reboot [#]

rsh win95 "<[INT]>" logoff [#]

The [#] are optional. You can specify a number of seconds to delay the action in this parameter. If you do not specify a number of seconds, it is immediate. For example:

rsh win95 "<[INT]>" shutdown 60 (Shutdown win95 in 1 minute)

The shutdown command shuts down Windows 95 and takes you back to the screen that says that you may turn off the power. After the shutdown, RSHD/95 will no longer respond to any requests.

The reboot command shuts down Windows 95, then restarts the PC and Windows 95. If RSHD/95 is running as a service or in the Startup group, it will restart with Windows 95.

The poweroff command will only have an effect if your system allows Windows 95 to turn off its power. If the system does not, it will have the same effect as the logoff command.

The logoff command will log off any user that is logged on to the Windows 95 system and then display the "log on" dialog box.

 

COPYING FILES USING RCP

Winsock RSHD/95 also provides Remote Copy (RCP) Server capability. This allows you to copy files to and from a PC running Winsock RSHD/95 using the rcp command.

The rcp command is commonly found on Unix systems, Windows NT systems, and in some TCP/IP packages for Windows and DOS. If your TCP/IP package does not provide the rcp command, you can use Winsock RCP from Denicomp Systems (not included with RSHD/95).

The rcp command is described in more detail in your TCP/IP package manual or with the manual that comes with Winsock RCP. However, here are a few examples of its use.

Important Note: Unlike the standard Unix rcp command and Denicomp Systems' rcp command (found in the Winsock RCP/RSH package), the Windows NT rcp command copies all files with ASCII conversion by default. Binary files must be copied using the -b option of NT's rcp command. If you do not use the -b option on binary files, the contents of the file will be altered on the destination system.

To copy a file from the host named "srvpc" to your PC or Unix system, use:

rcp srvpc:yourfile myfile

The file "yourfile" is copied from the host named "srvpc" to the file on your PC named "myfile". The host "srvpc" could be running either Windows and Winsock RSHD/95 or Unix.

To copy a file from your PC or Unix system to the PC named "srvpc", use:

rcp \lists\xmas.doc srvpc:\word\lists

The file \lists\xmas.doc is copied from your system to the file xmas.doc in the directory \word\lists on the PC named "srvpc".

To send the entire directory tree from your PC or Unix system to "srvpc", use:

rcp -b -r \share srvpc:\

All of the files and subdirectories in the directory \share are copied to the PC named "srvpc". It will create a \share directory in the root directory (\) of srvpc.

If the \share directory contained any subdirectories, they would be created on the other PC and all the files in them would also be copied.

To copy all of the files ending with ".xls" from "srvpc" to your PC, use:

rcp -b srvpc:\sheets\*.xls .

This copies all of the files ending with ".xls" in the directory \sheets on "srvpc" to the current directory (.) on your PC.

You can use drive letters if necessary. For example, to copy a file from the A: drive on the "srvpc" to your PC:

rcp srvpc:a:file.txt file.txt

This will copy "file.txt" from the A: drive on "srvpc" to the file "file.txt" on your system.

NOTE: Winsock RSHD/95 allows you to use both slashes (/) and backslashes (\) for directory separators. It will adjust appropriately. This is especially important for Unix users, since backslashes are interpreted by the shell and must be escaped by using two backslashes for every one backslash. Use slashes instead.

 

CONTROLLING WINSOCK RSHD/95

The Winsock RSHD/95 service can be controlled from the RSHD/95 Control Panel applet using the Service Control button. This can be used whether you are running RSHD/95 as a service or as a program.

Start the Winsock RSHD/95 Service

This starts the Winsock RSHD/95 Service if it is not currently running.

Stop the Winsock RSHD/95 Service

This stops the Winsock RSHD/95 Service if it is currently running. It will unload from memory and will no longer service clients using rcp or rsh until it is started again.

Refresh the Winsock RSHD/95 Service

This sends a signal to Winsock RSHD/95 to tell it to re-read the registry options and apply any changes when possible. This is useful if you change RSHD/95 options with a registry editor such as REGEDIT instead of the RSHD/95 Control Panel applet.

Install the Winsock RSHD/95 Service

This installs the Winsock RSHD/95 Service in Windows 95's list of services. It does not install the files from the Winsock RSHD/95 diskette. It only adds Winsock RSHD/95 to the list of services that Windows 95 can execute.

Remove the Winsock RSHD/95 Service

This removes the Winsock RSHD/95 Service from Windows 95's list of services. It does not delete any files. It only removes it from the list of services. Use the Install option to add it to the list again.

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